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How To Go From Failure To Success

September 18th, 2017

Failure is often the best teacher in life.  Painful at times?  Absolutely, because no one likes to fail.  We have the desire to succeed but an occasional failure helps us to learn new things along the way. How to go from failure to success

Failing at something teaches a lesson and helps you to change, grow and ultimately succeed.  The things we are working toward are not always easy but as the old saying goes, “practice makes perfect.”  Success takes time and there is often a learning curve.

The business environment is ever changing and an occasional failure is bound to happen.  Consider these steps to turn a failure into success:

  1. Seek advice from others.

Ask your trusted family members, friends and coworkers to give you feedback on your failure.  They will give you a different angle and perspective to consider.  If you want to succeed, you need to be willing to hear the truth from others.

What they share may make a huge difference in how you handle your business and clients going forward.  We don’t always see our situation as clearly as others.

  1. Switch your course of action.

After you listen to the feedback of others, be willing to adjust your habits, style, and course of action.

In other words, get yourself on track with a new plan to ensure success.

Albert Einstein once said that “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results.”  Don’t let that be your story; rather, remember that change is helpful and essential for success.

  1. Change is good.

If at first you don’t succeed, try and try again.  Change is a good thing.  Once you see that it’s necessary, act quickly to bring about the success you hope for.  We can learn a lot from failure.  (Changing just to change is not recommended. Change when necessary)

The goal is to grow and be different because of what we’ve experienced.  Don’t wallow in pity, self-doubt or the failure.  Remember that change is progress.

Business has a variety of facets that keep everyone on their toes.  Even though failure is inevitable from time to time, we can learn from those mishaps and grow in the process.

Success is usually not immediate.  I encourage you to value each “mishap” on your journey because they are learning opportunities that will help you succeed over time.

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

How To Boost Staff Morale

September 14th, 2017

When you run a business, there are a lot of challenges that you will face. Bringing on great employees is definitely a difficult thing to achieve. What might be even more difficult is keeping those individuals happy in their job.

It is very important that you invest in the staff and do things that will boost their morale. If you have people that are unhappy in their job, they will find other places to work.

Here are some great ways that you can boost staff morale.

Find Ways to Thank The Staff

Everyone needs to be thanked for their contribution to the team. Come up with ways that your staff will feel appreciated. This could come in the form of a bonus, party, retreat, or something simpler like a thank you note.

However, you chose to thank your staff, do it with sincerity. If it were not for these valuable people, your business would not be successful. If you are not sincere, the sentiment will be picked up on, and your efforts will not be received well.

Offer Continued Education

To help your staff feel more confident in their job, offer them continued learning opportunities. They will know they are valued if you invest in their education.

Providing training for your staff is beneficial to them and to you. The more trained they are, the better they will be able to do their job. Also, the more they know, the more valuable they will feel.

Provide Opportunities For Promotion

Great employees want a chance to grow in their jobs. Make sure that the more motivated employees have a place to move up to. Otherwise, they will become dissatisfied with your company and find another opportunity to pursue.

When you have staff members that are in a positive environment and in a job they enjoy, they will stay with you longer. If the moral of your employees drops, it makes production go down and your chances of high turnover increase. It is very important to invest in boosting your staff’s morale.

Need help boosting your staff’s morale? Give us a call today!

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Whose Temp Are They?

September 12th, 2017

“I often hire someone as a temp to do a bit of contract work for me. The job usually only lasts from 2-4 weeks and I pay them an agreed-upon amount. Is this the same as the independent contractors you’ve written about?”

Your HR Survival Tip

Probably not. We consider a temp to be someone’s employee who is assigned to a company for jobs that may be for short or long periods of time. While you can have your own pool of temps available to you, most are employed by an agency and you contract with the agency for that worker.
On the other hand, we consider an independent contractor to be a small business. They offer their services to you, invoice you when payment is due, and carry their own liability insurance. Plus, their fees are at risk if you aren’t pleased with the work they do.

Unless you are getting your temps through an agency, you need to put these workers on your payroll as you do with any other employee. Yes, if they don’t qualify as a business, they are employees. Only non-profits can have volunteers… everyone else is a business, an employee, or unemployed. You will always pay an employee or a business for any services you need.

There can be big fines for misclassifying these temps. Not only are you not paying payroll taxes on them but you aren’t providing paid sick leave. If you’re not prepared to put these workers on your payroll, hire or payroll them through a legitimate temp agency so you are legally compliant. Let us know if you need a referral.

Click here to read on >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Salaried But Not

September 8th, 2017

“Just to make things easier for me, I pay everyone a salary. What are my risks with doing this?”

Your HR Survival Tip

Where do I begin? Let’s talk about what being salaried really means. Bottom line, a salary is much more of a payroll term than a legal term. When HR professionals say someone is salaried, we are implying the employee is exempt. Exempt is the legal term to show an employee has met one of the legal exemptions from overtime pay, rules about meal and rest periods, etc. When payroll uses a salary, they are merely saying the employee gets paid the same amount each pay period.

The problem is, over the years, the terms “salaried” and “exempt” no longer carry distinct meanings for many companies and employees… and, oops, you just fell into a big hole when you don’t remember there are legal consequences for confusing those terms.

Your payroll system will usually ask if the new employee you’re adding will be on a salary or hourly. Why do they ask the question that way instead of exempt or non-exempt? Because most people either aren’t familiar with the terminology or they don’t know how to determine (legally) if someone is truly exempt. Choosing “salary” works for payroll but that doesn’t make it legal.

So often we hear non-exempt (hourly) employees are put into payroll as salaried “because it’s easier.” However, why on earth would you think it’s easier?

  • You still need to have non-exempt employees complete a timecard. The timecard is your only proof those employees were paid correctly.
  • Every payroll period you have to reconcile their salary amount against their time card to determine they were paid at least as much as owed.
  • If they worked more regular hours than the salary covers, you need to add that amount to the salary to avoid claims for late payment.
  • If they worked ANY over time, you must add that on top of the salary because a non-exempt’s salary can’t legally include overtime in California if the employee is really non-exempt hourly.
  • If your payroll is set for semi-monthly (twice per month), you have a huge risk because a semi-monthly salary defaults to 86.67 hours per pay period. Are those non-exempt hourly employees actually working 86.67 hours or are they really working 80, 88, or 96 hours? You’re paying too much or too little at least once per month and the state would love to hear about you.

With all the reconciliations and changes, you need to do each pay period to pay that salaried non-exempt employee correctly to avoid wage and hour law claims, where exactly is there less time and effort involved? Make it truly easy on yourself and put your non-exempt employees back to hourly in payroll so you just have to enter hours worked… isn’t that easier?  … Click here to read on >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Paying Under the Table

September 5th, 2017

“I occasionally pay people under the table when I have them participate in a working interview for 1-2 days before I decide whether or not to hire them. Once in a while, I also pay under the table when an employee is doing a different job for me on the side. Is there a better way to handle these situations to take away my risk?”

Your HR Survival Tip

Paying workers “under the table” means you are handing them cash and neither of you is reporting it (yet). There isn’t a way to take away your risk because what you are doing is illegal.

If your interview process includes having the candidate follow someone around for 1-2 days (shadowing) or actually performing the job for 1-2 days, this is compensable time. Paying this person cash instead of adding them to payroll could easily create problems for you. Yes, adding the person as an employee is more work than not doing it but that’s because you are only looking at the moment, not the long-term.

In the long-term, you need to look at a potential EDD audit because one of those people added you as an employer when they filed for unemployment. Whoops, EDD doesn’t show that person listed as one of your employees so they decide to audit you to see who else hasn’t been reported.

Your employees may have skills not needed for their usual job. However, you’ve realized one of those extra skills has value to you. The employee is  … Click here to read on >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Group Health Insurance Tidbits

August 31st, 2017

Group Health Insurance Tidbits

“I’m considering adding group health insurance for my employees. What do I need to do that the insurance broker won’t do?”

Your HR Survival Tip

It’s great you want to provide health insurance! Adding this benefit can be a big step due to the expense but you should find this will aid in recruitment and retention of employees.

You’ll want your broker to help you sign up for a Premium-Only Plan (POP) so you can take the employee’s share of any premium as a pre-tax deduction. Without a POP in place, any deductions must be made with after-tax dollars. You will always pay the full bill from the carrier and the employee’s share reimburses you.

Your broker will make a recommendation for certain plans but it will be up to you to decide how much of the premium is paid by you versus the employee. Our preference has you paying a percentage (50-100%) of the employee-only cost of the lowest level plan you offer. Employees then pay the remainder of that premium, plus the full cost of covering dependents or choosing a higher level plan. We prefer employees pay at least a small amount to save you money but to also avoid employees electing coverage just because it’s free rather than needed. You will find the amount a company might pay toward benefits will vary greatly based on your industry and ability to pay.

Reconciling the carrier’s bill every month is crucial. Insurance carriers don’t add or terminate employees as quickly as you might expect. You could see a back charge of 2 months of premiums because the bill is catching up on a new employee’s premiums. When someone’s coverage terminates, you submit their termination to the carrier but keep paying the full premium until the carrier pulls them off the plan and reimburses you for any premiums previously charged. If you try to deduct that employee’s premium off the bill, you’ll get a notice from the carrier stating you did not pay the bill in full and are now subject to cancellation. If an employee hasn’t been added or dropped by the end of 2 months, talk with your carrier or broker to ensure they received the change.

Pay stubs must list each  … Click here to read on >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Labor Commissioner Fines Contractor for Wage Theft of Subcontractor

August 24th, 2017

Labor Commissioner Fines Contractor for Wage Theft of Subcontractor

The Labor Commissioner issued a $250,000 fine for a general contractor for wage-and-hour violations that their drywall subcontractor committed.

The issued citation was for wage theft and fell under AB 1897 (Section 2810.3 of the Labor Code).

This is the first time that a general contractor was held responsible for wage theft of a sub. The statute says that businesses are responsible for their subcontractor’s wage-and-hour violations. Those that don’t follow this statute will suffer the consequences. Further, it gives clarity to the expectations set before contractors and helps them to follow the rules as outlined.

The Liability of the “Client Employer”

In short, when a contractor does not properly pay the earned compensation, then the “client employer” becomes liable. The scenario that happened in on a hotel project involved a general contractor’s drywall subcontractor that did not pay employees as promised in Southern California.

The Labor Commissioner discovered that the drywall contractor did not pay the full amount earned during a four weeks’ time period. Further, they were paying employees from an account with insufficient funds. Employees began to walk off the job site and filed complaints.

Labor Commissioner Citations

Citations were issued by the Labor Commissioner for both the general contractor and the subcontractor. The general contractor protested its liability for the subcontractor’s wage theft while the subcontractor did not. They accepted that they did not act appropriately in this situation.

After a hearing, it was found that the general contractor owed almost $250,000 for overtime, minimum wages, and penalties.

AB 1897

According to AB 1897, a client employer could be held liable for the subcontractor’s wages and penalties. They could also be charged for any workers’ compensation violations.  Waiting time penalties occur if the employer does not pay the employee’s final check. They get the daily rate multiplied by the unpaid number of days up to 30 days.

The Ruling

Julie Su, the Labor Commissioner, said: “This case addresses the pervasive problem of wage theft in subcontracted industries.” She continued that businesses and contractors should not hide behind their subcontractors regardless of whether they were in charge of the work performed.

AB 1897 will protect those that follow the rules. General contractors that consistently pay as they should and protect their employees and subcontractors will thrive under this ruling. Those that choose to violate this ruling will pay the consequences and they should.

We would love to hear your comments. Please email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Written for us by our associate Gary Sorrell, Sorrell Associates, LLC. Copyright protected. All rights reserved worldwide.

Effective Benefit Engagement Strategies

August 17th, 2017

Effective Benefit Engagement Strategies

Do your employees “get” and appreciate the benefits package that your company offers?  Statistics show that most employees don’t fully understand the value of what they have.

Companies should educate their staff about their benefits.  How quickly they forget orientation day!  They were most likely too nervous to comprehend what you told them anyway.

One thing is for sure, you want to continuously market your benefits package to your team.  The goal is for them to feel the value that they have received.  You want their continual buy in.

Steps to increase benefit engagement include:

  1. Orientation…What comes next?

After day 1, your new employee will be in all out training mode.  Be sure to follow up on the benefits package.  How?  Create an attractively laid out marketing piece that will allow for a clean, concise summation.  Plan to email it and hand deliver it to their desk/department.

  1. Involve the family

Your employee may not process the info as well as perhaps their spouse.  Consider a meeting, dinner, a meet and greet or some other type of session where questions can be answered.

The bottom line is that you want the “family” to see the value that you are offering too.  You don’t want your new hire to jump ship because the grass seems greener on the other side.

  1. Q & A

Offer a question and answer session where new hires can meet with upper management to find out more info about the company, benefits and any other lingering curiosities that may have crept in their minds since day one.

  1. Email Newsletter

Utilize your company emails to mention and explain the company’s benefit package.  Include tips on how to be sure they maximize their benefits.

Take the opportunity to occasionally reiterate the many great facets of your outstanding benefits package.  Keep the info in the forefront of their minds and they will be reminded of the value.

The key to benefit engagement strategies is to market, market, market your outstanding package to your staff.  Be sure to continue to tell your employees what you’ve “done for them lately.”

We would love to hear your comments. Please email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Written for us by our associate Gary Sorrell, Sorrell Associates, LLC. Copyright protected. All rights reserved worldwide.

Make Your Company Values Known

August 10th, 2017

Every business owner has a reason behind starting their company. Whatever that reason is, it is important that your staff understands it. When employees know your passions, they will feel more motivated to help you be successful.

Make Your Company Values KnownPeople will put more of themselves into something they believe in. It is your job as a CEO to make your vision for the company known to those that work for you. It is just as important for your top level management as well as your entry level employees to understand your vision.

Here are ways to make your values known to your employees.

Incorporate Your Vision Into Staff Orientation

When a new person comes onto the team, they need to be introduced to the vision of the company.

You will need to put together a very clear idea of what the company stands for and where you plan to take the company in the future.

Introducing the vision during orientation will help new employees understand how important it is for them to get behind the company’s values.

Share Your Passions During Staff Meetings

First of all, you should have regular staff meetings. During these meetings, it is a good idea to go over the vision and passions you have for the business. You do not have to take up much time doing this, but it should be part of your meetings to remind everyone why they are here.

Create An Engaging Marketing Campaign For Your Employees

It is just as important that you market your company to your employees as you do to your potential customers. Employee buy in is essential to having individuals that are loyal to you and work hard for the success of the business.

Put together engaging campaigns that can be made into poster form. These posters can be displayed in employee break areas or around high trafficked areas of the building.

Digital marketing is also an important outlet to get your vision across to employees. Put together a logo and tagline that can be included at the close of every email that you send.

When you have people in the company that know what you are passionate about, it will give them a sense of purpose. They will work harder and be more dedicated because they work for someone they can believe in. All of us are better at our jobs when we understand what the purpose of the job is and the direction of the company.

Do you need any help getting your company values known throughout the company? Contact us today!

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

Written for us by our associate Gary Sorrell, Sorrell Associates, LLC. Copyright protected. All rights reserved worldwide.

Confusing Wage and Sick Time Laws

August 9th, 2017

“I know we have to follow the minimum wage laws and the sick leave laws but it’s very confusing. I network with other business owners and we all seem to do something different. What is the law?”

Your HR Survival Tip

Yes, it’s confusing because there is a state law and 22 California localities have added different local laws. This means you may need different rules for different employees based on where they actually perform their work. It doesn’t help that both state and local laws may also have differences based on the size of your company.

Using a federal contractor … Click here to read on >>

We would love to hear your comments. Please leave your comments below or email us today!

 

San Diego County Headquarters:
The Lawton Group
4747 Viewridge Ave.
Suite 106
San Diego, CA 92123
Phone (858) 569-6260
Fax (866) 580-0089
Toll free (800) 834-4576
Inland Empire, LA and Orange County:
Inland Empire Branch
7177 Brockton Ave Suite 338
Riverside, CA 92506
Phone (909) 481-4443
Fax (909) 481-4642

 

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